Preschool Curriculum

Three to Four-Year-Old Program Curriculum

Our three to four-year-old pro­gram is a great way to intro­duce your child to school.Teacher with chidren's hand inside the pumpkin.

Stu­dents will enjoy a large part of each morn­ing engaged in play—generally called “cen­ter time”—choosing from a vari­ety of cen­ters rang­ing from build­ing to house­keep­ing to library to art.  Oth­er dai­ly com­po­nents include cir­cle time, snack time, and out­door recess time.

Curriculum

Our teach­ers ref­er­ence the Core Knowl­edge Preschool Sequence, a very thor­ough and thought­ful arrange­ment of devel­op­men­tal­ly appro­pri­ate skills and activ­i­ties for three through five year olds.  We also refer to the Wash­ing­ton State Ear­ly Learn­ing and Devel­op­ment Guide­lines.  We use these sources when devel­op­ing activ­i­ties, projects and mini lessons.  When plan­ning our themes, we also con­sid­er stu­dent inter­ests and abil­i­ties.

Four small children with musical instruments in a Mt Olive preschool classroom

Oral Language Development

Our teach­ers incor­po­rate sto­ries, songs, poems, and fin­ger plays into dai­ly cir­cle times to expose chil­dren to a wide vari­ety of lan­guage forms and pur­pos­es.  They also engage stu­dents in con­ver­sa­tion dur­ing play, cir­cle and snack times to devel­op stu­dents’ abil­i­ties to pro­vide detailed descrip­tions and con­vey mean­ing to oth­ers.

Fine Motor Development

Stu­dents are intro­duced to cor­rect pencil/crayon grip and have ample oppor­tu­ni­ty to prac­tice col­or­ing, draw­ing and paint­ing.  Activ­i­ties such as lac­ing cards, puz­zles, using tongs and work­ing with play dough also pro­mote fine motor skills.  Strong fine motor skills are a key com­po­nent of ear­ly lit­er­a­cy skills.

Mathematics

Stu­dents will be exposed to col­ors, shapes and num­bers 1–10 dur­ing cir­cle time through­out the year. Art projects and cen­ter activ­i­ties also pro­mote col­or, shape and num­ber aware­ness through play and explo­ration. Match­ing, group­ing and sort­ing activ­i­ties are incor­po­rat­ed through­out the year.  Cal­en­dar rou­tines, such as days of the week, are part of dai­ly cir­cle time.

Four to Five Year Old Program Curriculum

Our four to five-year-old pro­gram builds on skills learned in our three-year-old pro­gram, but is also a great start for chil­dren head­ing off to kinder­garten the fol­low­ing year. Stu­dents will enjoy a large part of each morn­ing engaged in play—generally called “cen­ter time”—choosing from a vari­ety of cen­ters rang­ing from build­ing to house­keep­ing to library to art.  Stu­dents also meet dai­ly for “teacher time”—a short work time focus­ing on lan­guage or math con­cepts, learn­ing a game, or prac­tic­ing fine motor skills. Oth­er dai­ly com­po­nents include cir­cle time, snack time, and out­door recess time.

Curriculum

Our teach­ers ref­er­ence the Core Knowl­edge Preschool Sequence, a very thor­ough and thought­ful arrange­ment of devel­op­men­tal­ly appro­pri­ate skills and activ­i­ties for three through five year olds.  We also refer to the Wash­ing­ton State Ear­ly Learn­ing and Devel­op­ment Guide­lines.  Our teach­ers also incor­po­rate aspects of the “Get Set for School” cur­ricu­lum, the Pre-K com­po­nent of Hand­writ­ing With­out Tears (HWT). HWT is used by many of the West Val­ley School Dis­trict kinder­garten teach­ers to teach writ­ten let­ter for­ma­tion. We also use “Alpha Friends” when intro­duc­ing let­ters of the alpha­bet.  “Alpha Friends” is a com­po­nent of the read­ing cur­ricu­lum used in WVSD kinder­garten class­rooms. Final­ly, we ref­er­ence the WVSD Kinder­garten Readi­ness Check­list as well.  We use these sources when devel­op­ing activ­i­ties, projects and mini lessons.  We also incor­po­rate stu­dent inter­ests and abil­i­ties in rela­tion to our theme when plan­ning.

Oral Language Development

Our teach­ers incor­po­rate sto­ries, songs, poems, and fin­ger plays into dai­ly cir­cle times to expose chil­dren to a wide vari­ety of lan­guage forms and pur­pos­es.  Each week, stu­dents will be exposed to a new let­ter name, sound and for­ma­tion, though they are not expect­ed to mem­o­rize them. We also prac­tice foun­da­tion­al read­ing skills, such as mov­ing from left to right and top to bot­tom of a page, and rec­og­niz­ing that let­ters make up words.  We prac­tice rec­og­niz­ing and nam­ing the let­ters of our names. We read and dis­cuss sto­ries togeth­er.

A preschool girl uses doctor's gown and play instruments
Preschool girl with med­ical toys from the Com­mu­ni­ty Helpers Unit

Fine Motor Development

Teach­ers intro­duce stu­dents to cor­rect pencil/crayon grip and they have ample oppor­tu­ni­ties to prac­tice col­or­ing, draw­ing and paint­ing.  Activ­i­ties such as lac­ing cards, putting togeth­er puz­zles, using tongs, and work­ing with play dough also pro­mote fine motor skills.  Stu­dents work with chalk, cray­on and pen­cil to devel­op line and shape draw­ing skills and ear­ly let­ter for­ma­tion skills.  Strong fine motor skills are a key com­po­nent of ear­ly lit­er­a­cy skills.

Mathematics

Stu­dents con­tin­ue their work with col­ors, shapes and the num­bers 1–20 dur­ing cir­cle, art and play time through­out the year. Cir­cle time rou­tines include cal­en­dar and weath­er com­po­nents.  Stu­dents answer a “Ques­tion of the Day” and use the response chart to prac­tice count­ing, com­par­ing, group­ing and mea­sur­ing.  We also spend time in cir­cle group­ing and clas­si­fy­ing by using fun cat­e­gories like the types of shoes we are wear­ing or the col­or of our shirts today.

Special Activities

Our extend­ed time peri­od allows us more time for fun!  We have time each week for more spe­cif­ic music instruc­tion, phys­i­cal edu­ca­tion, cook­ing or sci­ence projects, or putting on skits and plays.

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References and Resources

Alpha Friends:

 

Core Knowledge Preschool Sequence:

 

Get Set for School:

http://www.hwtears.com/gss

Washington Department of Early Learning:

http://www.del.wa.gov/publications/development/docs/guidelines.pdf

West Valley School District:

 

 

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